The Trip

Danaka + Burke Family at Snoqualmie Pass
Danaka + Burke Family at Snoqualmie Pass

Where do I start? The awesomeness of the scenery? Difficulty of hauling a couple hundred pounds up a mountain pass on loose gravel? The thrill of seeing our little girls play happy and content with anything they find on the forest floor? Or the difficulty of the logistics of getting us and our gear to where we needed to be?

I guess the story of our trip should start at the beginning. How do you get 2 children, 3 adults, 2 cargo bikes, 1 mountain bike and 1 trailer moved 167 miles to the start of a trail? Well, momma and kids take the bus to the train station and catch the big train to Tacoma, WA, while daddy and aunty get a rental truck to move the bikes and gear. They drive it to the station that mom and kiddos get off at, unload gear, drop off truck, start cycling.

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We followed the Cedar River trail south, camping between a river and the highway the first night. I was surprised at the number of late night/early morning bike commuters that used the trail we were camped beside. Nobody seemed to pay us any mind though, which was quite nice after a long stressful first day.

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Day 2 found us riding to the end of the paved section of trail and slogging along with big smiles on our faces over well packed gravel, stopping only when we got to locked gates in a park. What the heck? Where did the trail go? We spotted a fellow working at one of the park buildings and went over to ask him about the trail, and he very nicely gave us the low down on the situation we had unwittingly gotten ourselves into.

The Rail to Trail that we were following (Cedar River), was the continuation of the John Wayne Pioneer Trail that was our ultimate goal for our vacation. Our problem, was that the trail went straight through 90,638 acres of watershed, used by the City of Seattle, and the whole space was closed to the public after September, 2001, and very few trail maps of the area have been updated since that time. We would have to go around the watershed.

Danaka’s bike was lightest when unloaded, so I rode it to the closest town (Maple Valley) and rented a moving truck to get us around this big glitch in our trip. The only other option was to cycle with the little girls along 20 miles of highway with virtually no shoulder, and it was halfway through the afternoon already, so with our slow pace, we would have to find a place to camp right beside the highway. Didn’t like that idea.

With the truck we were able to get all of us around the watershed and up to North Bend, where we checked out the town a little bit and ended up crashing for the night in the back of the truck in a corner of a grocery store parking lot. It was a ten foot box truck, and remember it had all our big bicycle gear already in it! So Seth’s and my bikes got tied in place along each side, over the wheel wells, Danaka’s got suspended in mid air at the back of the box, and all the panniers were stuffed into any crevasse we could find. It left just enough room for Seth, the little girls and I to sleep shoulder to shoulder across the back wall with our feet funnelled toward the front where Danaka slept at an angle in front of the door, which we pulled down part way but tied so it could neither be opened from the outside, nor closed and us get locked in!

The nice part about camping beside a grocery store, was that we were able to get nice hot food for dinner, and fresh fruit for breakfast!

Okay, so we finally found the trail we wanted, just outside town, where we unloaded everything, and then I had to drive back into town with Danaka’s bike to do the whole “dropping off the truck” business, and find a bike shop to tighten one of the cranks on the bike. I was directed to SingleTrack Cycles and received wonderful friendly service, advice and local knowledge of the trails. They were a breath of fresh air after a rather stressful night of moving truck shenanigans.

We got rolling finally around noon and went pretty much without stop all on an up hill grade until we reached Rattlesnake Lake, where Marin and I went down and played in the mud and tree stumps for quite some time. It was just too much fun to stop!

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But we had to keep rolling, so we did, and found a camp spot with an amazing view! Oh yes, and we got to watch some rock climbers too. And a person gliding past in a motorized para-glider!

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With awesome views and only intermittent rumbles from the highway further down in the valley, we finally worked our way up to the top of the mountain pass, topping out half way through the Snoqualmie tunnel, which is 2.3 miles of hard packed gravel and dirt, with long, shallow, narrow ruts from bicycles grinding through the sporadic puddle caused by water dripping (or full fledged trickling) down from the ceiling. Of course in over 2 miles of tunnel, you need lights, even though the path is straight and you can see slivers of light from each end. But once you’re in the middle and turn OFF the lights, you can’t see diddily-squat. It’s been a long time since any of us were in darkness of that kind. We did try the “hand in front of our faces”, but to no avail. Only when looking at the light from one of the entrances could you then see, not your hand, but rather the absence of that light when you passed your hand between yourself and the entrance. There was no outline of things or anything! After a while of riding, I would think I was halfway through, only to look back and see the entrance was still large and I was far from halfway. Around mid point the tunnel became almost disconcerting. I couldn’t imagine going through by foot and taking 100 times longer!

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Once we passed through and filled up our water at the parking lot, the trail turned sloppy real fast. Our tires sunk down in the loose gravel and I think all of us fish tailed a couple times before we made it to the camping sites on the south end of Keechelus Lake. Marin really liked the lake, as the shores were steep and a mix of rocks and sand. We spent a long time sitting on a tall outcrop, throwing rocks over the edge, listening for the splash.

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That night we seriously discussed goals, miles, energy and expectations. It felt like we had been going for over a week, instead of having just finished our fourth day on the trail. We decided to cut the trip short, keep the camp set up the next morning and just do a quick day trip, then head home.

 

With only bare necessities and enough gear to get us un-comfortably but safely through the night if we got stranded somewhere, we headed out the next morning down the loose trail, with hardly any weight and a downhill grade. Eventually things levelled out and we passed through fields and farmland, swamps and over clear creeks. Our turnaround point was the “BBQ place” in South Cle Elum we had heard rants and raves about from multiple people. I guess there must be two places, because the one we went to had me wishing for Clay’s Smokehouse back in Portland after only three bites. Seth too. Not saying it was bad, it just didn’t come close to anything we were expecting.

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Our ride back to camp was long. We were getting tired, and Danaka was having that mental struggle that anybody who has set out on a multi day physical challenge has experienced. Thinking you can’t make it, you’re too tired, your knee hurts like hell, but knowing that you have to make it cause you have no choice, and you still don’t have the energy to keep pushing through. “I can’t do it”. It’s a hard spot to be in. Fortunately Seth and I have both been there multiple times before. Once I figured out what was sort of happening, we were able to make some changes, pull together and get us all safely back to camp in time for a late dinner.

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Next morning, we all felt a little sad that the trip was coming to an end and we were heading home, but there certainly was a lot of excitement and giddiness as well!

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Heading back toward North Bend, we made great time. I mean, heading downhill with heavy bikes is a heck of a lot easier than trying to fight gravity with those same bikes going uphill. What took us two days for us to go from North Bend to Lake Keechelus, we accomplished in reverse in less than one full day. We had time when we got into North Bend, to find the library and use their computers to figure out what bus routes the girls and I would need to take to get us back to Seattle so we could catch the train home to Portland the next day. Once that was figured out, our next task was to find a place to pitch our tents for the night. We headed north out of town and found a pretty good stealth site completely out of view from the trail. It was a little stressful, trying to keep the little girls quiet as we made dinner and set up the tents with the light fading and them just wanting to play, but we did it! There were no surprises in the morning. No cows wandering through, or rangers knocking on our poles. Yippy!!!

Breaking stealth camps can be kind of awkward, as my family usually wakes up hungry right away, but you gotta get everything broken down as fast as you can and out of there so there is no evidence of what you just did. That’s where I found easy to grab snack foods come in handy. Namely, dehydrated banana muffins. The girls loved them and it gave all of us something to settle our bellies as least temporarily.

Back in town, we eventually found our bus stop. Scrounged up a few baked goods from a local café, and said our goodbyes as the bus arrived. It was back to the girls and I taking public transportation home and Seth getting yet another rental truck. Here’s where we made our last big blunder. Instead of calling the rental places first thing to make sure they had something available before we got on the bus, it wasn’t until after the girls and I were already on our way before Seth found out that he would have to catch the same bus to a neighbouring town to get the only available truck. Two hours later he was on the same route that we had just taken (bus only ran every 2 hours). At this point we were just rolling our eyes and shaking our heads, dreaming of simply being home.

There’s not a whole lot to tell about the rest of the trip. The girls and I received an escort from a very nice person through the confusion of Seattle’s transit centre and construction. The girls had a grand time chasing each other through the wide open spaces of the train station, making people simultaneously smile at them and jump out of their way. On the train home I finally had a chance to look in a mirror and figure out what had been making my head itch like crazy for the last three days. Lice. Oh boy! When I found those little critters, all I could think of was the nit comb stashed in our cupboard. That, and try really really hard NOT to scratch! Literally, as soon as we got home, I kicked my shoes off and went straight to the bathroom to comb my hair without saying hi to anyone. Seth, by the way, got the truck and they (Seth and Danaka) had a safe drive home, beating us by half an hour. Just enough time to unload everything from the back and come meet us a couple blocks away for the final drag of the trip.

Next day, Seth dropped off the truck and came home with “our” beloved dog Lorax to keep the girls entertained for the day while we unpacked and cleaned our gear. Danaka helped out a ton too, with reading a kazillion books to Marin and keeping an eye on Elita.

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Whew! It’s been almost as epic trying to get this all typed out, as it was to do the trip!

If I left out any important stuff or simply left you wondering about something (besides the reason I hadn’t gotten this posted sooner),  please leave a comment and I will rectify things.

THANK YOU FOR READING!!!!!

 

Getting Ready

Life is always in a bit of turmoil. Surfing the waves and getting the most out of the ride is what makes the journey fun.

The camping trip we did as a family in June was absolutely wonderful, so we went ahead and pursued planning for another, much longer bike trip to be done in September. We had wanted to do this particular trail last year, but then we were expecting Elita, so we put it on the back burner, to come out again this year!

Seth has been working on logistics, bikes, and keeping an eye on any news pertaining to the area we will be cycling through, mostly keeping an eye on forest fires here in the north wet . I have been dehydrating food. My sister Danaka (who will be joining us for the trip) has been diligently training for the two week bike trip with us “crazy car-less bike people”(not that we’re training or anything!).

There is a big rubber-maid box under our kitchen table, slowly being filled with jars of dried food, whole meals dehydrated and crushed to make reconstituting easier. Seth did the math, 3 adults and 2 little children = 4 servings per meal. For dinner alone, that means 56 servings. If you add breakfast and lunch in there, that’s 168 servings to be prepared before setting out.

it takes a while to get a days food made while juggling 2 little kiddos, so now add 167 more meals but the meal means making and then dehydrating, packaging and remembering just how many meals it is equal to.  since our family has figured out the foods that we are happy with and those that our bodies do not wish to have inside,  we have decided that the time consuming effort of making our own meals for this trip is a trial on our end., an experiment, in nutrition and logistics.  we try to avoid gluten, sugar, oats, dairy, and all those malto sucroglucoxanthanem  whatevers that are in so much food.  and the sodium………  all just for some lighter packs and artificial food.  why go to nature to relax if the food you eat is fake.  how nature is that..

so all this in prep for a family ride on the John Wayne Pioneer Trail crossing the middle of Washington state.  this is an old rail road track that has been taken back by washington state and transitioned to a rail to trails .  yeah…..  bike tripping on the road is great.  bike tripping days on end in the woods, awesome.  and no traffic whizzing by.  our trip is going to be a fun challenge.  the biking will be the easy part.  just getting us all to and from the trailhead is the hard part.  how do you transport 2 infants, 3 big cargo bikes, a few trailers and 3 adults and not rely on a car.

amtrack, uhaul.  that is our only option and we think it will/should work.  so here is what we got so far.  2 kids and one adult travel up on a train at so many mph over a distance while changing diapers, napping and enjoying story time.  and 2 adults rent a uhaul truck, load a ton of stuff, (only the lightest in high tech light gear, still = a ton.  ) travel slower but with no stops up to the corresponding train stop .  once there one adult gets kicked out with all the stuff to sit curbside surrounded by a pile of gear and 2 big bikes.  (probably looking bored and unapproachable, we are on vacation..)  the other drives on to drop off uhaul and rides a bike to the pile of stuff on the curb.  and both wait for the arrival of the train with the rest of the team.

once the team is together and our reality sinks in,  off we start peddling towards the land of the rising sun,  EAST.  a few miles from the train spot is an urban bike trail that travels straight along a river to our next trail.  all connecting to each other in a long more rough trail.  and after just a few days.  gravel, dirt, woods,  nothing.  or as close to nothing as we can get.

this, even is not great, even thru the un-fun,  this is our happy place.  almost like going home.  i know that once into the trip it would be so easy to just keep biking… really.  life would not end if we never came back.  if we just fucked it all and kept traveling. sure, work, rent, stuff, bills.  all that crap would smack us upside the face. but what is all that stuff.  a leash to hold you in place and feed the machine.  it does not care about you.  it would not notice if you left, it would not notice if you stayed put and behaved like you are too.  the machine does not care about you.  this is only something you see once you have spent enough time out of the system.

ah, that was fun..

Marin Campfood

 

Side Note: Thank you Seth for “finishing” my post while I put the girls to bed!    I’m sure you readers can figure out what we each wrote?

Oaks Bottom

A little down south and up river, is a patch of wilderness in the city. A marsh fills the middle, with all varieties of birds congregating along the edges among the rushes. A paved bike trail skirts along the river side while a gravel and dirt path meanders through the narrow band of forest between marsh and residential yards.

Here’s some pictures we took while walking through the park.

Seth and Marin balancing for a photo
Seth and Marin balancing for a photo
Scratching my head subconciously while concentrating hard on balance
Scratching my head subconsciously while concentrating hard on balance
Marin working on her trapeze skills at an early age
Marin working on her trapeze skills at an early age

At the south end of the park is a ball field with picnic tables and such. It was a good place to let the dog run around, and obviously it turned out to be a good place for Seth to catch a nap.

Chewing on cool metal to sooth the gums while Seth dozes in the sunshine
Chewing on cool metal to sooth the gums while Seth dozes in the sunshine
Making sure the little girl has a good view from her lofty seat
Making sure the little girl has a good view from her lofty seat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Garden Baby

The weather has been absolutely beautiful here for the last couple days. While everyone else is stuck inside doing work or school, Marin and I have been spending the larger part of our days outside in the sunshine. She is getting a nice little farmer’s tan and a healthy dose of fresh greens and dirt suplemented into her diet.

My eddible peas out front are getting a daily pruning from my little girl as her Johnny-Jump-Up is set on the path right in front of the peas. She loves it out there! She can spin and watch wherever I go as I work in the garden, then go back to picking leaves off my peas. I’ve had to tie them back for fear there wouldn’t be anything left if I didn’t.

ImageYesterday she was perfectly clean, but I thought having a nice little bath outside would be nice for her. Baths are supposed to make you clean, right? It did the opposite for her! By the time I was finnished in the garden and she was finnished splashing around, she was pretty much covered from head to toe in mud! But she was a happy baby. ImageDirty Grin

Garden Life Under the Clouds

We had an amazingly long stretch of warm weather here in Portland, especially considering how early in the year it is. We were decked out in shorts and t-shirts, running around barefooted and working on our freckles. Seeds were planted in the garden, weeds were pulled, the dog was walked and now we are living under clouds again.

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The rain is good for the garden, that is sure. There are seedlings popping up in many places, though never quite fast enough for my impatience. My fear right now is that I might have inadvertently pulled up some seedlings while pulling the weeds. I guess there is no way to know for sure.

Some of my peas have come up nicely, their young tendrils making delicious accents to my salads, along with Rosemary flowers and a few kale leaves from an over-wintered plant. I am excited to eventually have my own lettuce to make my salads out of, but for now I am happy to be able to pick my own fixings.

It is amazing how fast the weeds grow though! It seems that I pull handfuls every time I step outside! If only they were all edible, then I could eat them as I pulled and they would not go to waste. Mind you, having them added to the compost pile keeps them in the garden cycle and so they are not wasted.

And the rain? Fortunately the days are still fairly warm, so getting wet is not completely miserable, and it means I do not have to drag the hose around to water the garden! There are always good ways to look at things. Yesterday when I got drenched while out on a walk with Marin and the dog, I was still grateful for the rain, as it brought the city streets a little bit closer to smelling clean. There still was not the fresh clean aroma of dripping moss-covered trees, salal and soggy pine needle strewn earth, but at least there were a few negative ions in the air and the smell of asphalt was subdued.